Sunday, November 01, 2009

The Cellar Door

Iron Plated Door


It's a new month and that means Theme Day. The November theme is Doorways. This old iron plated door can be found at Stenkulla in Fors. It's a door to an old root cellar. That cellar is the only remains of Stenkulla, a place with an interesting history. It is said that when the railroad from Stockholm to Nynäshamn, the Nynäsbanan was constructed, a little over a century ago, the owner of the the grocery store here, a man called Svante Vitus Karlsson (1868-1946), decided to move the building from Fors to Tungelsta, three kilometres away. The reason was obviously the location. Karlsson figured most people would now travel by train, and that his store along the old road, just south of Västerhaninge, wouldn't attract customers any more, especially as there was another grocery store just next door. People still debate whether the building was actually moved. What I do know is that Svin-Kalle ( he was a pig farmer), built a beautiful house near the railway station in Tungelsta. It's still there today. Although it has changed color and owners a few times over the years Today the building houses a few apartments and a pub. You can see a photo of the house here. And meet two of the people that live there. If you understand Swedish there's a PDF article about Stenkulla to read at Haninge.org.


Click here to view thumbnails for all participants

24 comments:

Lachezar said...

Beautiful choice! Cheers mate!

Ann said...

Just glorious.

Julie ScottsdaleDailyPhoto.com said...

wow, awesome door. such detail and image. what a find.

Hilda said...

That's a very interesting history, and I'm amazed that something actually survived. Fantastic textures in your photo!

Jacob said...

That's quite a door, although I don't think it will keep out certain little animals rooting around in the woods!

Leif Hagen said...

Steffe Meister - you really should do a better job of keeping up your house! Oj da! Handsome detailed doorway!

PurestGreen said...

I enjoy the stories that go along with your photos. Doors like this are wonderfully eerie.

Don and Krise said...

What a unique door and a great story to go with it. I clicked on the link to look at the house. Very nice. Great contribution to theme day Steffe.

Julie said...

This cellar door contains some of my favourite natural materials, Steffe: rock, rusty metal and decaying wood.

Why do you call it a "root" cellar? Thank you for all the historical information. It helps to add even more character to the door.

Jilly said...

Oh fabulous! Jumping up and down fabulous! Love the door, the history, the textures, colours. Perfect for today - in fact more than perfect. Bravo.

cieldequimper said...

Ah Steffe, this is a grand photo. Probably the best I've seen today. Have a great Sunday and November!

Steffe said...

The Swedish word for this type of cellar is Potatiskällare, or Jordkällare. It was a place where you stored vegetables.

brattcat said...

What an amazing image! Full of texture, subtle colors, mystery. An outstanding theme day entry.

White Oleander said...

Happy theme day :)

Denton said...

Wonderful photo Steffe .. my first thought was that this door must have a story and they you provided the story. A great post.

Randy said...

Wonderful shot. I'll bet it would look great in Black and White as well.

Lois said...

That is a great Theme Day picture! Very interesting history to go along with it too.

Halcyon said...

This is a cool doorway. Great choice for the theme day!

marley said...

Nice choice. Looks like something from a horror film!

In Three Rivers, Michigan said...

A very aged and interesting doorway (and photograph!) Lovely textures of wood and rust.

Three Rivers Daily Photo

Rebeccas.se said...

Jättevackert och udda! Kul att hitta hit, är nyinflyttad Tungelstabo, så jag får väl utforska omgivningarna genom din blogg. :)

Buck said...

What a great story - perfectly matches the photo.

Baruch said...

Great find!

Vogon Poet said...

Impressive door, it looks like something my granddad would do with spare wood and tin. It is absolutely familiar for something coming from so far up North... Very good choice for this Theme Day.